dc

Economic Resources


A Toolkit to Help Your Community Understand the Economic Impacts of Your Local Food System Initiatives
The Toolkit is made up of seven modules that can be grouped into two stages of food system planning, assessment and evaluation. The first set of modules (1-4) guides the first stages of an economic impact assessment and includes framing the system, relevant economic activities and assessment process as well as collecting and analyzing relevant primary and secondary data. The second set of modules (5-7) provides a more technical set of practices and discussion of how to use the information collected in stage one to conduct a more rigorous economic impact analysis.


CDC’s Making the Business Case for Prevention video series

  • Community Health Investments Yield Results
  • Community Partnerships Benefit Students, Schools and Health
  • Health Initiatives Boost Economic Development
  • Community Partnerships Benefit Students, Schools and Health

 


Safer Streets, Stronger Economies
What do communities get for their investments in Complete Streets? In this study of 37 projects, Smart Growth America found that Complete Streets projects tended to improve safety for everyone, increased biking and walking, and showed a mix of increases and decreases in automobile traffic, depending in part on the project goal. Compared to conventional transportation projects, these projects were remarkably affordable, and were an inexpensive way to achieve transportation goals. In terms of economic returns, the limited data available suggests Complete Streets projects were related to broader economic gains like increased employment and higher property values.

Investment in Safe Routes to School Projects: Public Health Benefits for the Larger Community
The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is designed to encourage active and safe transportation for children to school. This report examines the potential broader impact of these programs on communities within 0.5 mile (0.8 km) of schools.

Health Means Business
The Health Means Business campaign is a two-year commitment by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, with the goals of creating an enlightened national discussion which engages small, medium, and large businesses about the interdependency between health and economic empowerment, and to promote a culture of health in the United States. In addition, we hope to create a framework for continued dialogue with our community partners that will take us beyond 2017.

The Economics of Local Food Systems: A Toolkit to Guide Community Discussions, Assessments and Choices
The Toolkit is made up of seven modules that can be grouped into two stages of food system planning, assessment, and evaluation. The first set of modules (1-4) guides the preliminary stages of an impact assessment and includes framing the system, relevant economic activities and assessment process as well as collecting and analyzing relevant primary and secondary data. For those seeking a more robust economic impact assessment, the second set of modules (5-7) provides a more technical set of practices and discussion of how to use the information collected in stage one to conduct a more rigorous analysis.

Amazing Place: Six Cities Using the New Recipe for Economic Development
This new resource looks at how six cities are using smart growth and placemaking strategies to gain a competitive edge. Our case study examples — Boise, ID; Denver, CO; Greenville, SC; Minneapolis, MN; Nashville, TN; and Pittsburgh, PA—represent a diversity of geographies, locations, population sizes, industries, and development challenges. Despite their differences, all of these cities are using smart growth development to successfully attract new companies and new residents.


Public Health is ROI
In this video, find out why public health is a great investment for all.