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June 6, 2016 1:30 PMCategory: Nutrition, Physical Activity

In Case You Missed It: Health News – May

Each month we’ll highlight a few news stories from around the nation related to nutrition, physical activity and chronic disease.

Please see below for select stories from May:


newspaperMay 3: Social Service Shortfalls Hinder Health, Boost Medical Spending
States that spend more money on social services and public health programs relative to medical care have much healthier residents than states that don’t, a study out today by a prominent public health researcher found.The study comes as the Obama administration prepares to fund its own research to support the idea that higher social service spending can improve health and lower health care costs. More…

May 10: FDA Seeks to Redefine ‘Healthy’
What’s healthier than a Pop-Tart? Not almonds, according to today’s regulatory rules. That could change as the Food and Drug Administration kicks off a review of the 1990s official definition of “healthy” at the urging of food companies and lawmakers. More…

May 12: Parents Turn to Doctors, Lawmakers to Save School Recess
When parents tell Dr. Gregory Fox their boisterous child was stuck in a classroom all day, the Rhode Island pediatrician takes out his notepad and writes a doctor’s order to send to school.
“Please do not take away this child’s recess.” More…

May 16: A Little Healthy Competition in the Interests of Healthy Communities
Competitions and prizes are everywhere in philanthropy these days, with the goal of finding breakthrough ideas, scaling ideas that work, and spreading best practices. We’ve written about the pros and cons of this approach to philanthropy, as not all competititions are well conceived. But overall, there’s no question that many are stirring the pot in different fields in a good way. More…

May 18: And the fittest city in the U.S. is …
Washington, D.C., is the fittest city in the United States for the third year in a row, according to a ranking of the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the country. The nation’s capital was closely followed by Minneapolis-St. Paul and Denver as the second- and third-fittest of the 50 metro areas, according to the American Fitness Index. More…

May 19: Place Matters: Making The United States The Healthiest Nation, Community By Community
Our health is affected by more than what happens in the doctor’s office. The factors that can make or break our health include the many societal conditions we face on a daily basis—determinants such as access to fresh foods, neighborhood walkability, and public safety. More…

May 20: 1 minute of hard exercise may be as good as 45 minutes of regular exercise
For many of us, the most pressing question about exercise is: How little can I get away with? The answer, according to a sophisticated new study of interval training, may be very, very little. In this new experiment, in fact, 60 seconds of strenuous exertion proved to be as successful at improving health and fitness as three-quarters of an hour of moderate exercise. More…

May 20: It’s Bike to Work Day
May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists and celebrated in communities from coast to coast. Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to showcase the many benefits of bicycling — and encourage more folks to giving biking a try. More…

May 20: Americans could prevent roughly half of all cancer deaths by doing these four things
Roughly half of cancer deaths in the United States could be prevented or forestalled if all Americans quit smoking, cut back on drinking, maintained a healthful weight and got at least 150 minutes of exercise each week. These same measures would also reduce the number of new cancer diagnoses by 40% to 70%, according to a new report. More…

 May 20: The Sneaky Source of a Silent Killer
You’ve heard it for years: Cut down on sodium. The more salt in your diet, the more problems for your body.The science behind this could fill a library. The dangers of ignoring it could fill a morgue. Chilling as that sounds, we know that too much sodium can cause high blood pressure, and we know that high blood pressure is a primary cause of heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world. More…

May 21: The Battle of Added vs. Naturally Occurring Sugars on Food Labels is Coming to Supermarket Shelves
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday finalized the rules for the new Nutrition Facts label that First Lady Michelle Obama has been pushing and fighting for since practically the day she moved into the White House. In the announcement made along with FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg she said, “So this is a big deal, and it’s going to make a big difference for families all across this country.” More…

May 27: New York City Can Enforce Rule on Salt Warnings in Restaurants: Court
New York City can enforce a rule requiring chain restaurants to post warnings on menu items high in sodium, a New York appeals court ruled on Thursday. In February, a New York state judge upheld the rule, knocking down a challenge by the National Restaurant Association. More…

May 31: Hidden Heart Disease is The Top Health Threat For U.S. Women
Tracy Solomon Clark is outgoing and energetic — a former fundraiser for big companies and big causes. As she charged through her 40s she had “no clue,” she says, that there might be a problem with her heart. More…

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